Posts filed under Water management

Water and mining conflicts in the information age

My father was an olive farmer and very active on the valley olive farmer association in Peru. In the eighties, there was a tailings spill that afected the river water and the irrigated lands. Based on what they could understand of contamination and water chemistry, they had the iniciative of taking water samples and show them to water authorities.

Posted on February 10, 2014 and filed under Environment, Mining, Water management.

 

 

Cost (& Time) optimization of hydrogeological studies

Impact on groundwater flow from mining facilities could be evaluated many times alongs the different mining phases, many of these evaluation are done by different consultant companies. This post is focused on strategies and best practices for cost (& time) optimization, specially for hydrogeological investigation on mining projects.

 

 

What about landsat LDCM for water resources?

 

A new Landsat satellite was launched one Monday (Feb. 11, 2013) from the Vanderberg Air Force Base in California. The LDCM or Landsat Data Continuity Mission joined the 15-year-old Landsat 7 and the 30-year-old Landsat 5. Since satellites are attracted by earth gravity, the launch of new satellites is important to preserve the continuity of the image registration.

 

 

Main factors affecting groundwater regime

The concept of a groundwater regime is based on the fact that the occurrence and distribution of groundwater is not merely a product of chance, but the result of a combination of climatic, hydrologic, geologic, topographic and soil-forming factors that together form an integrated dynamic system. These factors are interrelated in such a way that each provides some insight into the functioning of the total system and thus serves as an indicator of local conditions of groundwater occurrence and distribution (PAEL, 1993).

 

 

Groundwater modeling of the Al Haza Oasis

The Kingdom of Saudi-Arabia, located in the central part of the Arabian Peninsula, is covered mostly by large deserts of rock and sand with low precipitation and a very arid climate. During the last 20 years a continuous increase in groundwater extraction has taken place due to industrial and agricultural activities.

 

 

Groundwater monitoring system implementation

A monitoring system is a platform where the level and quality records that describe groundwater resources are generated, made available and evaluated. These records are consistent, representative and long lasting. To manage the aquifer on a local or regional level it is required to have environmental managers with easy access to comprehensive, representative and reliable information.

 

 

Development of a watershed-based water balance

 

Water balance is known as the balance of water entering the system and the water that leaves within a specified time, however, in order to understand it better we need to understand: what is a watershed? Unterstood as a whole, a unity, as a system, as the space bounded by the union of all the headers that form the main river through the territory drained by a single natural drainage system.

 

 

Case studies of watershed-based water balance

 

A watershed can be defined as “the topographic area within which apparent surface water runoff drains to a specific point on a stream or to a waterbody such as a lake” (Shimon, 2010), in this way a watershed works as a large water collector converting water inputs into runoff and water storage (Chavarri, 2012).